History


Erik Reitzel’s Symbolic Globe

Erik Reitzel, the inventor of the Symbolic Globe and Danish civil engineer and professor, specialized in bearing structures and minimal structural design resulting in major savings in construction materials. To create Reitzel‘s Symbolic Globe, people from across the globe participating in the Summit on Social Development – perhaps the first cooperative international architectural project – put up the 15 meter globe in Copenhagen in 1995. It is now standing on the UNESCO piazza in Paris.ICA-SUV is thankful for Erik Reitzel‘s permission to use the globe as ICA-SUV‘s icon.

History

The SUV began when forty-one archivists from thirteen countries attended the first meeting of the provisional section at the 1992 ICA Congress in Montreal. It came about by-and-large through the vision and work of an Australian archivist, Alan Ives, who, with the support of Charles Kecskemeti, Secretary General of ICA, gathered together an ad hoc committee of university archivists and planned a program to launch the section. A steering committee was elected and with some changes, provided leadership for the section during its first four years.

Marjorie Barritt took over as chair from Alan Ives in August of 1993. The Section’s articles were approved at the Beijing September, 1996 ICA General Assembly (Archivum vol. 43 (1997) 365).

Satellite image submitted by the U.S. Geological Survey, EROS Center.

Satellite image submitted by the U.S. Geological Survey, EROS Center.

While a provisional Section of ICA, the SUV held seminars in 1994 (Lancaster), 1995 (Washington), 1996 (Beijing), and the model for subsequent years, with an emphasis on annual seminars was launched. As reflected in the central topic of the Lancaster meeting, “Documenting Science and Technology in an Academic Setting,” from the outset, the Section had an interest in the archives of science, and at this time, the ICA executive asked the SUV to include the existing ICA Committee on the Archives of Science within the SUV.

The Lancaster meeting also saw the establishment of the Bibliography Committee, a group that has subsequently issued separate bibliographies of works relating to archival practices in universities and research institutions covering publications from United States, works in Spanish published in Latin America, publications in Portuguese, and French works on contemporary science archives. Subsequent annual seminars have been held in Barcelona, Spain (1997), Stockholm, Sweden (1998),Haifa, Israel (1999), Cordoba, Spain (2000), London, UK (2001), Lima, Peru (2002), Warsaw/Krakow, Poland (2003), Vienna, Austria (2004), East Lansing, U.S.A. (2005), Reykjavik, Iceland (2006), Dundee, Scotland (2007), Kuala Lampur, Malaysia (2008), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil(2009), Prague, Czech Republic (2010), Edmonton, Canada (2011), Barbados (2013), and Paris (2014). Each focused on a specific theme, although general topics of university and science archives administration were also discussed. Each included valuable tours of local archives and historic sites.