Tag Archives: women librarians

Publications: The Newsletters of Women in Libraries and Women Library Workers

Since 1970 the Women in Libraries Newsletter (and Women Library Workers Journal, 1975-1993) have provided information resources for women working in libraries. Older issues are still information rich for current and future readers. Read on to learn more about the art and history of Women in Libraries and Women Library Workers Newsletters!

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The ALA Mexican Border Traveling Library Service

While most of the American Library Association Library War Service’s efforts were concentrated in camps and hospitals in the United States and Europe, there was also a need for books for the soldiers stationed along the Mexican border. Chalmers Hadley, the librarian of the Denver Public Library, surveyed the desire for books among soldiers at […]

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The Gift of Literacy: Lutie E. Stearns

In the middle of all of the holiday cheer, December is also a month for librarians across the country to think back on those who gave back to their communities.  The late Lutie Eugenia Stearns, born on September 13, 1866, influenced many within the field of librarianship.  With the holiday season upon us, who better […]

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Activism and Advocacy in ALA: Women’s Organizations

Found in RS 13/6/17

There are several units within the American Library Association that support women in the library profession and as a whole. Many of these groups arose during the second wave of feminism in the 1960s-80s in response to political and social movements outside of the ALA. Women in librarianship wanted the predominately-female profession to be regarded with […]

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Clara S. Jones: “Awareness is Not Burdened with Repression; It is Liberating”

During the 1975 American Library Association Annual Conference, Clara Stanton Jones was announced as the Vice-President and President-Elect of the American Library Association. Her term as President would start during the ALA’s 1976 Centennial Conference, a fitting celebration for the first African American President of the ALA. Her experience as Director of the Detroit Public […]

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Mary Wright Plummer

To continue our blog series highlighting pioneering women librarians, this next post will focus on Mary Wright Plummer (1856-1916).  A member of Melvil Dewey’s first class in librarianship at Columbia College, Plummer went on to establish an impressive career in librarian education, children’s librarianship, and international librarianship, and served as the ALA’s 2nd female president […]

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Miss “Public Libraries” Mary Eileen Ahern

Festschrifts are a common way to honor someone in academia, and line the shelves of many academic libraries. They typically contain academic essays related to the person’s life work, contributed traditionally by the person’s former doctoral students and colleagues. But what about a Festschrift that’s instead full of nothing but praise for the person being […]

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Have you a card catalog? Katharine L. Sharp’s Catechism for Librarians

The more things change, the more they stay the same, or so you will think when you look at this laundry list of key considerations Katherine L. Sharp outlines for someone setting up a library in her writing “Catechism for Librarians.” Unlike a religious Catechism, she outlines not what to believe but a series of questions […]

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“The Best Man in America is a Woman”: Katharine L. Sharp and the First “Lady Librarians”

For an educated woman at the turn of the century, there were few options for a intellectually satisfying career, as Katharine L. Sharp discovered as a newly minted college graduate in 1885. She taught foreign languages at a high school in Illinois for two years, but then she took a position as Assistant Librarian at […]

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Madam President

Before women were allowed to vote in US elections, the American Library Association found its leadership in Theresa West Elmendorf.  In 1911, over thirty years after the founding of the ALA, Elmendorf was elected the first female president of the association.

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